NHS Digital Data Release Register - reformatted

Nuvia Ltd

Project 1 — DARS-NIC-147756-SMGHS

Opt outs honoured: Y

Sensitive: Sensitive, and Non Sensitive

When: 2016/04 (or before) — 2018/05.

Repeats: Ongoing

Legal basis: Section 251 approval is in place for the flow of identifiable data, Approved researcher accreditation under section 39(4)(i) and 39(5) of the Statistical Registration Service Act 2007

Categories: Identifiable

Datasets:

  • MRIS - Cause of Death Report
  • MRIS - Cohort Event Notification Report
  • MRIS - Scottish NHS / Registration
  • MRIS - Bespoke

Benefits:

Studies of the MR183 cohort have influenced and are expected to influence the development of the Ionising Radiation Regulations (IRRs) which regulate the exposure of people at work and of the public. The correct regulation of doses benefits the health not only of nuclear workers, but anyone else who works with radiation, such as medical radiographers and members of the public exposed as a result of medical x-rays or radioactive discharges to the environment. The IRRs are directly based on the authoritative recommendations of organisations such as the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). These organisations monitor the latest research literature and will be aware of past and future publications from MR183. In particular the UNSCEAR 2006 and 2012 reports cited various publications which use MR183 data. No record level data is or will be shared with any other organisation not specified in the application. Any data shared is aggregated with small number suppressed in line with HES Analysis guide.

Outputs:

Outputs were presented as aggregated tables and figures, with suppression of low-numbered cells in line with the HES analysis guide where appropriate. As part of a previous EU funded project, the SHIELD database has been updated with all the internal dosimetry data required to undertake this work. The outputs included peer-reviewed publications and a publicly available web site. Data from the MR183 cohort has been used in some 13 publications in high-impact peer-reviewed journals. For example: Beral V, Fraser P, Carpenter L, Booth M, Brown A and Rose G (1988) Mortality of employees of the Atomic Weapons Establishment, 1951-1982. British Medical Journal, 297, 757-770. Carpenter L, Higgins C, Douglas A, Fraser P, Beral V and Smith P (1994) Combined analysis of mortality in three United Kingdom nuclear industry workforces, 1946-1988. British Journal of Cancer. 78, 1224-1232 Cardis E, Gilbert E, Carpenter L, Howe G, Kato I, Armstrong B, Beral V, Cowper G, Douglas A, Fix J, Fry S, Kaldor J, Lave C, Salmon L, Smith P, Voelz G and Wiggs L (1995) Effects of low doses and low dose rates of external ionizing radiation: cancer mortality among nuclear industry workers in three countries. Radiation Research, 142, 117-132 Johnson, P., Atkinson, WD and Nicholls, JL (1999) Updated analysis of mortality at UK Atomic Weapons Establishments. Southport 1999 - Proceedings of the 6th International SRP Symposium. M.C. Thorne (ed). SRP, London Roman E, Doyle P, Maconochie N, Davies G, Smith P and Beral V (1999) Cancer in children of nuclear industry employees: report on children aged under 25 years from nuclear industry family study, British Medical Journal; 318, 1443–1450 Burt A, Maconochie N, Doyle P, Roman E (2004) Learning difficulties in children born to male UK nuclear industry employees; analysis from the nuclear industry family study, Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 61, 786-789 Grellier J, Atkinson, W et al (2016) Risk of lung cancer mortality in nuclear workers from internal exposure to alpha particle-emitting radionuclides. Epidemiology (in press) Future outputs are expected to focus on the health effects of inhaled or ingested radionuclides which have been little studied anywhere hitherto. Outputs will include peer-reviewed publications and a publicly available web site. In all cases data will be presented as aggregated tables and figures, with suppression of low-numbered cells in line with the HES analysis guide where necessary.

Processing:

The data already disseminated will be accessed and processed by substantive employees of Nuvia and only for the purposes described in the application. MR183 is a flagging study, but the cohort is fixed and no new flagging has taken place for many years, so no data is provided to NHS Digital by Nuvia. The data received by Nuvia from NHS Digital falls into three categories: 1. Mortality Data Date, causes and place of death, unique study identifier, together with sufficient identity data to confirm that the flag was correctly set, i.e. name, date of birth, NHS number, occupation, home address. 2. Emigrations and Reregistration Date of event, unique study identifier, together with sufficient identity data to confirm that the flag was correctly set, i.e. name, date of birth, NHS number. 3. Cancer Registrations Date of diagnosis, disease code, unique study identifier, but no identity data. The study has a favourable ethical opinion from the NHS Research Ethics Committee, Oxford C. AWE make regular reports on the study to workforce representatives at Joint Health and Safety Meetings. Nuvia will not provide access to for any third parties to access record level data, even where these third parties are study partners. The use of this data will be limited to Nuvia for the purpose outlined above only. Data published or provided to third parties will be limited to aggregated data, at area, organisational or cohort-level all subject to small number suppression in line with the HES Analysis Guide. Nuvia is currently part of a European consortium and is seeking funding to conduct a new study, which would entail data sharing with PHE. Any instances of data sharing or processing of data relating to a new study not outlined in this agreement will be subject to separate applications to NHS Digital. New data subjects are recognised and added to the SHIELD database when their personnel data is sent to the Health Effects team by UKAEA’s contractors CSC, or by DSRL and Magnox. Annually, radiation dose data arrives from the dosimetry services (ADSs) of the same employers and is linked to the data in SHIELD by name, DOB and National Insurance Number (NIN). Periodically the required details for flagging are sent to NHS Digital and Dumfries. When data comes to the study from NHS Digital, either as event notifications or members and postings listings, it is initially linked to the data in the database using name, DOB and NHS Number. Subsequently, if the study are happy that the correct person has been flagged then the study will link on member number. The study have to retain the identity data in the database even after the routine linkage has taken place, because periodically the study add new categories of exposure data. A recent example is the addition of 70 years’ worth of internal radiation contamination assessments to the SHIELD database. SHIELD is an Oracle 12 database, hosted on a server which is only accessible to authorised SHIELD users. Within SHIELD the followup data from NHS Digital is only available to those with the accredited researcher approvals. Data security is an important part of the culture of SHIELD users. Typical analyses would be: • Calculation of Standardised Mortality Ratios (SMRs) and Registration Ratios (SRRs) to compare the cohort with the national population in terms of mortality and cancer morbidity. • Calculation of Rate Ratios to compare radiation workers with non-radiation workers in the nuclear industry. • Tests for trends of mortality and morbidity rates with increasing radiation dose. • Logistic regression analyses to calculate the Excess Relative Risk per unit of radiation dose. All processing of ONS data is in accordance with standard ONS terms and conditions.

Objectives:

The aim of the study is to describe the mortality experience of past and present employees of the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, with special reference to the effects of radiation exposure on mortality. This will be done by; a) Comparing within the AWRE the mortality of radiation with that of non-radiation workers b) Comparing the mortality of radiation workers at varying levels of radiation exposure to establish whether there is any evidence of a dose-dependent excess of mortality. c) Determining whether deaths from specific diseases, especially malignancies, are more common among radiation workers than among non-radiation workers and, if so, their relationship to level of radiation exposure; and d) Comparing the mortality of AWRE employees with that of the working population in the UK.


Project 2 — DARS-NIC-147834-LHQ2R

Opt outs honoured: Y

Sensitive: Sensitive, and Non Sensitive

When: 2016/04 (or before) — 2018/05.

Repeats: Ongoing

Legal basis: Section 251 approval is in place for the flow of identifiable data, Approved researcher accreditation under section 39(4)(i) and 39(5) of the Statistical Registration Service Act 2007

Categories: Identifiable

Datasets:

  • MRIS - Cause of Death Report
  • MRIS - Cohort Event Notification Report
  • MRIS - Scottish NHS / Registration
  • MRIS - Flagging Current Status Report
  • MRIS - Members and Postings Report

Benefits:

Studies of the MR110 cohort have influenced and are expected to influence the development of the Ionising Radiation Regulations (IRRs) which regulate the exposure of people at work and of the public. The correct regulation of doses benefits the health not only of nuclear workers, but anyone else who works with radiation, such as medical radiographers and members of the public exposed as a result of medical x-rays or radioactive discharges to the environment. The IRRs are directly based on the authoritative recommendations of organisations such as the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). These organisations monitor the latest research literature and will be aware of past and future publications from MR110. In particular the UNSCEAR 2006 and 2012 reports cited various publications which use MR110 data. No record level data is or will be shared with any other organisation not specified in the application. Any data shared is aggregated with small number suppressed in line with HES Analysis guide.

Outputs:

Outputs were presented as aggregated tables and figures, with suppression of low-numbered cells in line with the HES analysis guide where appropriate. As part of a previous EU funded project, the SHIELD database has been updated with all the internal dosimetry data required to undertake this work. The outputs included peer-reviewed publications and a publicly available web site. Data from the MR110 cohort has been used in some 20 publications in high-impact peer-reviewed journals. For example: Beral V, Inskip H, Fraser P, Booth M, Coleman D and Rose G (1985) Mortality of employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, 1946-1979. British Medical Journal, 291, 440-447. Fraser, P, Carpenter L, Maconochie N, Higgins C, Booth M and Beral V (1993) Cancer Mortality and morbidity in employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, 1946-86. British Journal of Cancer, 67, 615-624. Rooney C, Beral V, Maconochie N, Fraser P and Davies G (1993) Case-control study of prostatic cancer in employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. British Medical Journal, 307, 1391-1397 Roman E, Doyle P, Maconochie N, Davies G, Smith P and Beral V (1999) Cancer in children of nuclear industry employees: report on children aged under 25 years from nuclear industry family study, British Medical Journal; 318, 1443–1450 Atkinson WD, Law DV, Bromley KJ and Inskip HM (2004) Mortality of employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority 1946-97 Occupational & .Environmental Medicine 61, 577-585 Atkinson WD, Law DV, Bromley KJ (2007) A decline in mortality from prostate cancer in the UK Atomic Energy Authority workforce. Journal of Radiation Protection, 27, 437-445 Grellier J, Atkinson, W et al (2016) Risk of lung cancer mortality in nuclear workers from internal exposure to alpha particle-emitting radionuclides. Epidemiology (in press) Future outputs are expected to focus on the health effects of inhaled or ingested radionuclides which have been little studied anywhere hitherto. Outputs will include peer-reviewed publications and a publicly available web site. In all cases data will be presented as aggregated tables and figures, with suppression of low-numbered cells in line with the HES analysis guide where necessary.

Processing:

The data requested and already disseminated will be accessed and processed by substantive employees of Nuvia and only for the purposes described in the application. MR110 is a flagging study, so data is provided to NHS Digital by Nuvia to enable the flags to be set. For each individual in the cohort this data comprises, name, date of birth, NHS number, home address, date to address and a unique study identifier. The data requested by Nuvia from NHS Digital falls into three categories: 1. Mortality Data Date, causes and place of death, unique study identifier, together with sufficient identity data to confirm that the flag was correctly set, i.e. name, date of birth, NHS number, occupation, home address. 2. Emigrations and Reregistration Date of event, unique study identifier, together with sufficient identity data to confirm that the flag was correctly set, i.e. name, date of birth, NHS number. 3. Cancer Registrations Date of diagnosis, disease code, unique study identifier, but no identity data. The study has a favourable ethical opinion from the NHS Research Ethics Committee, Oxford C. It has approval from, and reports to the PHE/NDA Epidemiology Governance Group, which includes employee representatives. Nuvia will not provide access to for any third parties to access record level data, even where these third parties are study partners. The use of this data will be limited to Nuvia for the purpose outlined above only. Data published or provided to third parties will be limited to aggregated data, at area, organisational or cohort-level all subject to small number suppression in line with the HES Analysis Guide. Nuvia is currently part of a European consortium and is seeking funding to conduct a new study, which would entail data sharing with PHE. Any instances of data sharing or processing of data relating to a new study not outlined in this agreement will be subject to separate applications to NHS Digital. New data subjects are recognised and added to the SHIELD database when their personnel data is sent to the Health Effects team by UKAEA’s contractors CSC, or by DSRL and Magnox. Annually, radiation dose data arrives from the dosimetry services (ADSs) of the same employers and is linked to the data in SHIELD by name, DOB and National Insurance Number (NIN). Periodically the required details for flagging are sent to NHS Digital and Dumfries. When data comes to the study from NHS Digital, either as event notifications or members and postings listings, it is initially linked to the data in the database using name, DOB and NHS Number. Subsequently, if the study are happy that the correct person has been flagged then the study will link on member number. The study have to retain the identity data in the database even after the routine linkage has taken place, because periodically the study add new categories of exposure data. A recent example is the addition of 70 years’ worth of internal radiation contamination assessments to the SHIELD database. SHIELD is an Oracle 12 database, hosted on a server which is only accessible to authorised SHIELD users. Within SHIELD the followup data from NHS Digital is only available to those with the accredited researcher approvals. Data security is an important part of the culture of SHIELD users. Typical analyses would be: • Calculation of Standardised Mortality Ratios (SMRs) and Registration Ratios (SRRs) to compare the cohort with the national population in terms of mortality and cancer morbidity. • Calculation of Rate Ratios to compare radiation workers with non-radiation workers in the nuclear industry. • Tests for trends of mortality and morbidity rates with increasing radiation dose. • Logistic regression analyses to calculate the Excess Relative Risk per unit of radiation dose. ONS Terms and Conditions will be adhered to.

Objectives:

An epidemiological study of past and present employees to determine the risks from radiation at low levels of exposure. The study is especially concerned with the indication of malignancies which may not be adequately reflected in mortality statistics.